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History of Crumlin

  • council: Antrim Borough Council
  • population: 4,259
  • phone code: 028
  • postcode area: BT29
  • county: County Antrim

Crumlin takes its name from the Irish for ‘The Crooked Glen' and in ancient times this area was heavily wooded with oak forests. In 1765 Rowley Heylands built the first industrial flour mills in the north of Ireland. These mills greatly encouraged the growing of wheat in the area and the village began to prosper. By the 1830's Crumlin had become a post town with its own courthouse and a monthly market. For over a hundred years Crumlin's success was linked to the flour mills and then the Ulster Woollen Co. Ltd, which manufactured flannels, worsted coating, fingering and kitting yarns, and the famous Lough Neagh Tweeds. Crumlin today serves as a market town for the predominately rural hinterland on this eastern shore of Lough Neagh

The areas around Crumlin, particularly Nutts Corner and Aldergrove, which is now the site for Belfast International Airport which connects Northern Ireland with the rest of the world, have provided air services for Northern Ireland since 1917. Langford Lodge was one of 25 sites in Northern Ireland, which was built during the Second World War as an airfield for military use. The Ulster Aviation Society have retained on this site a significant collection of Aviatation History and Artefacts as well as actual planes which can be viewed by the public. For more information contact Antrim Tourist Information Centre 02894 46 51 5

Crumlin Glen
The Crumlin River rises on the slopes of Divis Mountain and flows into Lough Neagh. By the time it reaches Crumlin Glen the banks are steep and heavily wooded. Upstream of the Glen is a large overflowing weir, which forms a waterfall. Downstream the river is more natural in appearance. Woodland is mixed with a variety of trees, plants and birds, which can be viewed by public access to Crumlin Glen carpark off Mill Road

TACT Wildlife Centre
TACT (Talnotry Avian Care Trust), located in Crumlin, is home to a wide variety of rescued birds and small animals from all over Ireland. Sick or injured wild birds and other small creatures come to TACT in need of help. Visitors are welcome to visit the owls, falcons, buzzards and other birds of prey. For further information contact TACT via their website http://www.tactwildlifecentre.org.uk

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